Art Exhibits Winter/Spring 2020

 

ordinary radiance by Bob Schmitt

the seven allusions: the journeys within
Bob Schmitt
January 2 – April 30, 2020

Look through the Eyes of Others:
You May be Surprised by what you See

Fawzia Khan
May 1 – July 31, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

Browse our past art exhibits


Art exhibits can be viewed on the ground level of Carondelet Center, Monday-Friday and weekends. See below for specific hours.

Building Hours January 26 – February 9
Building opens at 8:30 am unless otherwise noted below.

Sunday, January 26: 7:00 am – 7:00 pm

Monday, January 27: Close at 8:30 pm

Tuesday, January 28: Close at 8:00 pm

Wednesday, January 29: Close at 8:00 pm

Thursday, January 30: Close at 4:30 pm

Friday, January 31: Close at 9:00 pm

Saturday, February 1: 7:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday, February 2: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Monday, February 3: Close at 9:00 pm

Tuesday, February 4: Close at 8:30 pm

Wednesday, February 5: Close at 8:30 pm

Thursday, February 6: Close at 9:00 pm

Friday, February 7: Close at 9:30 pm

Saturday, February 8: 7:30 am – 6:00 pm

Sunday, February 9: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Jan
2
Thu
the seven allusions: the journeys within @ Carondelet Center
Jan 2 – Apr 30 all-day

memory by Bob Schmitt

Minnesota brush painter Bob Schmitt presents seven previous unexhibited graphic prints alluding to experiences in one’s own inner life:

  • ordinary radiance
  • memory
  • reckless abandon
  • grace
  • wonder
  • rapture
  • faith

Accompanying these images are seven separate pieces expressing each allusion in Chinese calligraphy.

Discover experience that often exists in places beyond words.

 

 

Conversations with artist Bob Schmitt:

 

grace by Bob Schmitt

Opening and Conversation with the Artist
Tuesday, January 28, 6:30 – 8:00 pm

 

Artist Reflection: “Allusions or illusions?”
Tuesday, February 25, 6:30 – 8:00 pm

 

 

Artist:

Bob Schmitt is a Quaker and a student and teacher of Chinese calligraphy and painting who lives and paints a stone’s throw from Minnehaha Falls. He began brush painting as a 12-year-old watching public television and has studied weekly with a Chinese painting master for over 20 years.

 

 

 

Art exhibits can be viewed on the ground level of Carondelet Center, Monday-Friday and weekends. See below for specific hours.

Building Hours January 26 – February 9
Building opens at 8:30 am unless otherwise noted below.

Sunday, January 26: 7:00 am – 7:00 pm

Monday, January 27: Close at 8:30 pm

Tuesday, January 28: Close at 8:00 pm

Wednesday, January 29: Close at 8:00 pm

Thursday, January 30: Close at 4:30 pm

Friday, January 31: Close at 9:00 pm

Saturday, February 1: 7:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday, February 2: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Monday, February 3: Close at 9:00 pm

Tuesday, February 4: Close at 8:30 pm

Wednesday, February 5: Close at 8:30 pm

Thursday, February 6: Close at 9:00 pm

Friday, February 7: Close at 9:30 pm

Saturday, February 8: 7:30 am – 6:00 pm

Sunday, February 9: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

May
1
Fri
Look through the Eyes of Others: You May be Surprised by what you See @ Carondelet Center
May 1 – Jul 31 all-day

In every conflict, there is a propaganda machine that defines the enemy as “not like us,” as “The Other.” We do this in war to enable soldiers to kill, but stereotyping based on race, age, and gender happens in peacetime, too.

This series gives viewers the opportunity to look through the eyes of others so to speak. Each of the six “black boxes” has a different interior. Looking in, the viewer sees a face with his/her/their own eyes in the place of the figure’s eyes—simultaneously looking into another’s head as well as seeing themselves as the other. The cast bronze faces lack racially distinct coloration and are reduced to shapes, lines and texture. The castings are concave rather than convex. As the viewer looks at the multiple images visible, the brain “flips” the image from concave to convex and back, an allusion to the unreliability of visual perception which constitutes much of the basis for racialization.

 

 

Artist:

Like many child migrants, Fawzia Khan has a foot in more than one culture but does not wholly belong to any. The Nigerian-born Pakistani-American artist explores themes of identity, gender roles, and bias, and what lurks below the surface or within the self to reveal truths about the human condition.

Formerly a practicing obstetrician/gynecologist, she is active in the Twin Cities arts community, and has a permanent installation in the Artery project in the Hopkins Center for the Arts.