Women of Faith in the Gospel of Luke & Acts

Luke’s gospel tells more stories about women than the other gospels, but women’s place in Luke and Acts warrants a suspicious feminist eye. What place do women have in the early Christian communities? What about the women who labor with Paul as coworkers, deacons, and apostles in his missionary world? How do these sacred canonical texts contribute to claiming equal place for women in our churches today? Joan Mitchell, CSJ, facilitated this series.

Osseous Stirrings

These photographs were made in light of ancient texts and those of our communities and earth suffering from a changing climate. They are images of ecological lament and fragile vitality that invite an earth-formed perspective on narrative and justice in the age of climate crisis.

Fall Soul: The Soul of the Living Universe

In “The Soul of the Living Universe” we will explore, re-imagine, and embody a new unifying Christian story of the cosmos. Delio’s brilliant lectures will be enhanced by embodied performance of the universe’s evolution directed by Emily Jarrett Hughes. Osseous Stirrings, a photography exhibition by Emilie Bouvier inspired by “dry bones” narratives from Genesis and Ezekiel, speaks of ecological lament and fragile vitality. This conference invites the creative expression of all participants as we move together to embody our role as co-creator, participant in the unfolding of life.

O Black Madonna

What is the unbreakable, indestructible essence inside each of us that the art of dance seeks to reveal? Dancer-choreographer Maureen Fleming searches for an understanding of this internal and universal dimension through her installation featuring photography by Lois Greenfield, Christopher Odo, Spencer Tunic and Fleming.

Abounding in Spirit: Fall 2015 Hedgerow

Among wise, creative, and inspiring theologians today, Elizabeth Johnson and Diana L. Hayes stand out. Both will be featured in the Hedgerow Seminar and through their most recent books. They will take us to the heart of issues challenging our faith today: our treatment of the natural world, and the poverty and prejudice embedded in U.S. social structures.